Nonprofits are getting their cut from Met Museum admissions

Night shot of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan.
Night shot of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan.
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Nonprofits are getting their cut from Met Museum admissions

And other updates from across New York.
March 19, 2019

More than 175 cultural organizations got their cut of $2.8 million in revenues from admissions to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. A 2018 agreement allowed the renowned museum to charge a fee to out-of-state visitors, departing from its traditional pay-what-you-wish model, The New York Times reports.

Half of the funding will go towards 160 groups, each of which will receive between $1,000 and $40,000, according to a press release from the Mayor’s Office. These Cultural Development Fund grants support services in high-need neighborhoods as identified by this report. Recipients include Mind-Builders Creative Arts Center in the Bronx, Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, Harlem Stage in Manhattan, Louis Armstrong House Museum in Queens, and St. George Theater in Staten Island.

The other $1.4 million goes to the Cultural Institutions Group. Sixteen groups will receive between $25,000 and $175,000 to support equity among these members of the group. Recipients include the Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning, El Museo del Barrio, Studio Museum in Harlem, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, Staten Island Children’s Museum, and Bronx Museum of the Arts.

A full list of recipients is here.

 

The Long Island-based Second Chance Reentry received $22,000 in new funding on March 14. The money will support programming aimed at helping formerly incarcerated people transition back to society and was presented by the The Long Island Unitarian Universalist Fund at the Long Island Community Foundation.

 

The Center for Urban Community Services has received an $875,000 contract from the New York City Health and Mental Hygiene. The money will fund supportive housing, according to the City Record. Care for The Homeless will provide outreach expertise to the agency per a $132,812 contract.

 

Two nonprofit leaders appeared on the WBAI Radio’s “City Watch.” Arts was on the minds of guests on a a March 17 episode of the program, hosted by Jeff Simmons of Anat Gerstein. Ballet Hispánico Artistic Director and CEO Eduardo Vilaro, and Queens Theatre Executive Director Taryn Sacramone appeared on the program, as well as City Councilman Francisco Moya and Pace University Assistant Vice President of Cultural Martin Kagan.

 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s proposed state budget will make New York City pay more for sheltering homeless people. That is the conclusion of a new policy brief from the city Independent Budget Office. A provision in the budget would require the city to pay 10 percent of certain shelter costs that traditionally were covered by federal funding. But the new proposed budget would shift about $59 million in costs onto the city starting in Fiscal Year 2020, according to the brief.

Zach Williams
Zach Williams
is a staff reporter at New York Nonprofit Media and sister publication City & State.
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