Nonprofits are making a new push for single payer health care

New York state capitol at sunset.
New York state capitol at sunset.
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Nonprofits are making a new push for single payer health care

And other updates from across New York.
April 3, 2019

Nonprofits are making a new push for single payer health care in New York. Groups including the FPWA will brainstorm via Twitter starting at 1 p.m. today to discuss the New York Health Act. With Democrats in control of the state Senate and Assembly, supporters of the legislation say that they have never been closer to making single payer a reality. The upcoming Tweetstorm will follow yesterday’s rally in the Capitol, when Assemblyman Richard Gottfried and state Sen. Gustavo Rivera – the sponsors of the legislation – promised to hold upcoming hearings on the issue. Find out more here.

 

The Bronx Defenders won a new $3.3 million contract from the New York City Department of Social Services. The money will fund legal services for immigrant families through June 2019, according to the City Record. Another big deal went to the Brooklyn-based White Glove Community Care, which received a $3.59 million contract from the agency to provide home health care services. Volunteers of America-Greater New York will provide $357,260 worth of supportive housing for homeless adults. Edwin Gould Services for Children and Families is getting a $250,000 contract from the department for the Grow Rise Lead program for adolescent girls.

 

Three advocates for autistic people were recognized at a March 29 event in Rye Brook. Westchester County Executive George Latimer joined advocates at the event organized by Yes She Can, a Westchester nonprofit that helps teens and young women with autism. More than $14,500 was raised at the event to support programming, according to a spokeswoman.

The honorees were: Pat Rowan, a social worker; Joy Soodik, senior managing director and chief compliance officer at Clarfeld Financial Advisors; and Paul Morris, an autistic man who lives independently and who has become an advocate for his peers.

 

Citizens’ Committee for Children has something to show about pay disparities in early childhood education. Teachers who work at nonprofits that provide pre-K services on behalf of the city are paid thousands less per year than their city-employed counterparts. Nonprofits are threatening to strike if they do not get their way. A post on the CCC website has a series of infographics illustrating the pay disparities. Have a look here.

Zach Williams
Zach Williams
is a staff reporter at New York Nonprofit Media and sister publication City & State.
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