Half of homeless domestic violence survivors feel unsafe in NYC shelter system

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Half of homeless domestic violence survivors feel unsafe in NYC shelter system

Domestic violence is a major driver of the city's homelessness crisis.
February 3, 2020

Half of homeless domestic violence survivors don’t feel safe in New York City’s shelter system, according to a survey conducted by New Destiny Housing with the Family Homelessness Coalition, the New York Post reports. 

A little more than half of those surveyed added that they didn’t know about the city’s homeless prevention services; 44% of respondents also didn’t get help finding affordable housing. 

Domestic violence has become a primary driver of New York City’s homelessness crisis as well, as described in a report from New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer last year. About 41% of those entering shelters run by the Department of Homeless Services do so because of domestic violence.

There is an alternate shelter system run by the Human Resources Administration specifically for domestic violence survivors, which provides additional social services. But a 180-day time limit for residency at these shelters means that many survivors are left to find permanent housing or enter the general shelter system. New York City currently only has the capacity to house 23% of survivors in these specialized shelters.

NYN Media reporter Kay Dervesh
Kay Dervishi
is a staff reporter at NYN Media.
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