These might be the best-run nonprofits in New York

Eight nonprofits have won New York Community Trust Nonprofit Excellence Awards.
Eight nonprofits have won New York Community Trust Nonprofit Excellence Awards.
Illustration by NYN Media
Eight nonprofits have won New York Community Trust Nonprofit Excellence Awards.

These might be the best-run nonprofits in New York

And other updates from across the state.
October 19, 2018

There are 20 finalists for the $100,000 Spark Prize. The Brooklyn Community Foundation announced which nonprofits were still in the running on Oct. 17, with the five winners to be named in January. In the meantime, the finalists will each get a $5,000 donation match during the upcoming #GivingTuesday. Read the full list of finalists here.

 

The Nathan Cummings Foundation is offering three fellowships for people looking to pursue projects related to climate change or inequality. Each fellow will have up to $150,000 and 18 months at their disposal to realize projects in one of the following focus areas: inclusive clean economy; racial and economic justice; corporate and political accountability; and voice, creativity and culture, according to an announcement on the foundation’s website. Applications are due on Dec. 14. Apply here.

 

 

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration raised more than $1.9 million at an Oct. 17 gala. The event brought more than 500 people to The Pierre Hotel in Manhattan to benefit research into the most common form of dementia for people under 60. About 60,000 people nationwide suffer from the disease, which currently has no approved treatment.

 

Phipps Neighborhoods has won a $3.5 million contract from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The money will fund congregate supportive housing, according to the City Record. South Bronx Community Management will provide emergency shelter for homeless families per a $9.2 million contract with the city Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

 

Eight nonprofits have won New York Community Trust Nonprofit Excellence Awards. A 31-person panel chose Safe Horizon as having “the most innovative and replicable management practices,” according to an Oct. 18 press release. Day One and the Osborne Association were the runners up. Here’s the full list taken verbatim from the release:

  • The Osborne Association (Bronx) is dedicated to transforming the criminal justice system and to reducing crime and its human and economic costs. They are recognized for their practices in Results and Impact, where they leverage data to influence policy and refine their programs.
  • St. Nicks Alliance (Brooklyn) transforms the lives of low and moderate income people through employment, education, housing, and health care; delivering impactful services with measurable outcomes to children, adults, and the elderly. This North Brooklyn-based organization has transformed lives through their programs for more than 40 years. They are recognized for their practices in Governance because they engage in risk assessment and have strong fiscal oversight.
  • Literacy, Inc. (Manhattan) engages families and community members to support young readers in high need neighborhoods. They are recognized for their practices in Financial Management because they develop and use true cost calculations in a strategic way.
  • Grand Street Settlement (Manhattan) expands opportunities for low-income families and individuals by providing culturally relevant services that support community-building, advocacy, self-determination, and an enriched quality of life. Their community-based programs have strengthened neighborhoods in the Lower East Side and Brooklyn since 1916. They are recognized for their practices in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion because they have strong strategies to recruit and hire from the communities they serve, and they invest in leadership pipelines.
  • Day One (Manhattan) partners with youth to end dating abuse and domestic violence through community education, supportive services, legal advocacy, and leadership development. They are recognized for their practices in Human Resources, where they are transparent with staff about budgets and salary, while supporting a fun and innovative work environment.

 

  • Safe Horizon (Manhattan) provides support, prevents violence and promotes justice for victims of crime and abuse, their families, and communities. They are recognized for their practices in Information Technology because they excel in their proactive and collaborative planning processes for technology infrastructure.
  • Education Through Music (Manhattan) partners with under-resourced schools to provide music as a core subject for all children, and utilizes music education as a catalyst to improve academic achievement, motivation for school, and self-confidence. They are recognized for their practices in Communications because they have a strong understanding of social media.
  • Center for Urban Pedagogy (Brooklyn) uses the power of design and art to increase meaningful civic engagement, particularly among historically underrepresented communities. They are recognized for their practices in Fundraising, where they foster a culture of philanthropy among their staff.
Zach Williams
Zach Williams
is a staff reporter at New York Nonprofit Media and sister publication City & State.
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